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October 29, 2010
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The Chapter by Norsehound The Chapter by Norsehound
November's just around the corner.

OUS-10 Krigga armed with a missile saddle.

:icondonotuseplz::iconmyartplz:
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:iconirmax-comix:
irmax-comix Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2010  Professional Digital Artist
again excellent!
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:iconvaeldragon:
VaelDragon Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2010  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Nice work :3
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:iconthirtyon3:
ThirtyOn3 Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2010
Done well!
btw. It reminds me "Hunter" from Half-Life.
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:iconkennturner:
kennturner Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2010
Awesome work!
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:iconeterno-huevon:
Eterno-Huevon Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2010
That gives a whole new meaning to "Blazing Saddles"
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:icontekanako-the-first:
tekanako-the-first Featured By Owner Oct 29, 2010  Student General Artist
Nice work, good to see the moon bunny again, I shouldn't show my NF cat this, it would make him reminisce about his bunny hunting days.

Ahh, an idea for you, look up 'terraformed moon' on Wikipedia and it should give lots of good ideas for the Lunar faction. Also have a look at this deviation and it should spark your imagination: [link]
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:iconnorsehound:
Norsehound Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2010
The moon will never be terraformed in this setting.
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:iconchizek:
Chizek Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2010
The moon, terraformed? Heresy ]=<

The moon does not have the magnetic field to be able to protect enough atmosphere from being "swept" away by solar radiation.

That is why Mars is dried up, its molten core began to cool off and it lost strength in its magnetic field, solar rays took more gas and water from the planet that it did before.

Its good that your sticking to your guns, I still want to know how the lunar citizens live, what do their "cities" look like inside and how is life without a sky or high gravity?
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:iconnorsehound:
Norsehound Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2010
I'm stuck on the gravity problem, resorting to handwaving until I can find a suitable answer. I've looked a few times for resources on living in microgravity... and apart from one source (a sort of 'hidden' article on Atomic Rocket talking about sex in space) there isn't a lot of documentation on living in a /reduced/-gravity environment. Plenty on weightlessness though, but the setting isn't in pure space and it doesn't help define the lunar city situation.

As for a life indoors? Not sure about that one either, especially in the psychological study of if you spent your entire life indoors with no concept of a wide open sky. It's shaping up so that future Lunar Citizens may never be biologically equipped to live on Earth (microgravity, open skies are alien to them), but in some strange way I find that fitting for the situation that's shaping up (ie the Earth wanting to conquer the moon anyway despite, essentially, the evolution of a sub-species of humans on the moon. UEPC would probably call them subhuman troglodytes anyway and now have biological justification :\

The moon bases are largely subterranean. Perhaps someday I'll describe the particulars (or during the context of NaNo). The image in my mind now is similar along the lines of Clavius Base from 2001 and Moonbase alpha from Space: 1999... at least in the case of the above-ground parts.
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:iconghostbirdofprey:
GhostBirdofPrey Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2010
I've actually seen in a few science fiction pieces where native Lunarians were taller than native Terrans. With the lower gravity the body would need to spend less resources for each centimeter of growth. As an unfortunate side effect though, a life spent growing in that reduced gravity would make a trip to earth very difficult if not impossible.

As for the wide open sky, I don't see how that's necessarily a problem. Surely Lunarians would go above ground occasionally, so they WOULD have a concept of a sky; that's not saying they would feel comfortable in open spaces.
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:icontekanako-the-first:
tekanako-the-first Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2010  Student General Artist
Have you though of using a device similar to the core for creating gravity, that would possibly work.
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:iconchizek:
Chizek Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2010
well, after a year your bones will have gone through a complete cycle of deconstruction and reconstruction, so bone decay would be most effectively reduced through regular conditioning.

Basically people would have to have significant amounts of time in their week spent on conditioning exercises to keep their bones strong. This would not mean that the lunar people could suddenly walk on earth gravity; however, it would keep them from being "frail".

I think the only large open spaces would be for manufacturing and agriculture; of course large spaces would also be required for water reserves, sewage waste, recyclables, and other storage reserves.

Anyway, dwarf fortress is a good example for making subterranean civilizations, much fun included!
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:iconghostbirdofprey:
GhostBirdofPrey Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2010
Bone and muscle decay wouldn't be a problem though. THe atrophy would stabilize at a level that allows your body to support itself in lunar gravity because daily life would provide sufficient exercise to keep your bones and muscles at that level of fitness. You would be weak and frail by earth standards, but normal activity would keep you sufficiently fit for lunar gravity, though it's still a good idea to go the the gym a few times a week (just like it is on earth). In fact, weakened muscles might be a good thing since you would be able to walk normally instead of bounding into the ceilings constantly due to overpowered muscles. Another advantage is that having smaller muscles mean, you have a lower caloric requirement; that certainly would make it easier to feed people. The time you have problems is when trying to go back to Earth.
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:iconchizek:
Chizek Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2010
I don't think people would have a problem bounding into ceilings from having large muscles, we don't always have to push with full-force. Though our muscles would definitely need to adapt to the change in gravity, it would mess up our balance too.

Anyway, the reason bone density would be a problem is because even if we don't need the bone density for moon work we do not know the dangers of having less bone marrow (or maybe we do, havn't found anything.). Less marrow means less blood cells, low gravity also has some different effects on blood and lymphatic circulation.
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:iconghostbirdofprey:
GhostBirdofPrey Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2010
You'd still have to get used to the lower gravity. Imagine there is a crate you move around often, usually it weighs 50 pounds, one day you go to pick it up expecting it to be heavy, but theres nothing in it this time, so you just put all your strength into moving something that weighs 2 pounds. You are surprised when it shoots up into the air. I imagine it would be similar on the moon, you are used to walking in 1G, pushing off with the force you are accustomed to using would send you a couple feet into the air, just watch Apollo Mission footage. I imagine walking wouldn't pose a problem, but running would be a bad idea since getting air time on each stride is what running is.


As for marrow, I'm not sure. Does the marrow also atrophy in long duration space missions? I am not as versed on space adaptation as I would like, and I haven't heard anything about that, though the lymphatic system might be an issue too. To be honest we know a lot about the dangers of prolonged exposure to a freefall environment, but little to none about adaptation to low gravity environments.
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(1 Reply)
:iconlonesamuraifox:
LoneSamuraiFox Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2010  Hobbyist Writer
Moon cannot be terraformed, because of 'dead' core. I bet if even human tried to 'warm' it a bit, well, moon could explode. xD

But 1/6 of Earth G. gives a lot of advantiges - like getting older a bit slower.
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:iconchizek:
Chizek Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2010
would you age slower? Or would a compromised circulatory system make it harder to survive?

Basically, our lymphatic system is a key part of our immune system and it relies a lot on pressure and gravity. Research into low gravity does show reduced immune systems as a result.
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:icontekanako-the-first:
tekanako-the-first Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2010  Student General Artist
Anyways, terraforming uses very advanced technology (and bacteria), it would take thousands of years to get the core running and to sponge water out of the crust. Then you have to set up an ozone layer and a greenhouse. I can see why it is not terraformed in AXEL.
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:iconchizek:
Chizek Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2010
don't forget that you need a magnetic field to shield your atmosphere from solar radiation scooping it away.

Moon doesn't have a molten iron core to generate a magnetic field, Mar's molten core has cooled enough that its magnetic field could not protect the atmosphere enough, hence why its barren now.
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:icontekanako-the-first:
tekanako-the-first Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2010  Student General Artist
Actually... it does, look at the wiki page on the moon. You should find that it also has an atmosphere... however, it is very thin so it cannot hold any Oxygen, of which is accounted to the slow dynamo of its core - meaning that has none to little of magnetic field.

You are however, right about Mars, whatever of its thin atmosphere that remains is bombarded by solar winds, while parts of it are just cut away. There is also a theory that a boliod smashed into mars, causing part of the atmosphere to be ejected into space. Mars also does not have tectonic plates, of which means that it cannot easily re-generate Carbon Dioxide or any other materials.

Tectonic plates on Earth may have been caused by asteroid collisions, ejections from the core and possibly the collision with Thera.
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:iconchizek:
Chizek Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2010
yea, mars is just a little bit to small, or else it would have been able to have stayed warm and its tectonic movement would still occur.

Like Venus, who has too much of it =P

Though one thing that came to mind is space debris. If you have war in around earth's orbit, the debris will travel around the earth going about 100 km/second! If you catch it from the wrong angle your ship/mech would be obliterated. Causing more debris =P
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